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Mass Transit and Real-Time Location Systems (RTLS): Enhancing Urban Mobility

2024-01-22T08:54:17+00:00

Mass Transit and Real-Time Location Systems (RTLS): Enhancing Urban Mobility Urbanization has led to an unprecedented surge in population density, creating challenges in managing transportation effectively. Mass transit systems, encompassing buses, trains, subways, and other communal modes of transportation, play a pivotal role in addressing these challenges. Their importance lies not only in alleviating traffic congestion but also in reducing carbon emissions, fostering sustainability, and providing an accessible and cost-effective alternative for the masses.

Mass Transit and Real-Time Location Systems (RTLS): Enhancing Urban Mobility2024-01-22T08:54:17+00:00

A Rapid Increase in IoT Adoption? – Manufacturing & IoT in 2023 Survey

2023-10-17T15:17:01+01:00

Is There A Rapid Increase in IoT Adoption? - Manufacturing & IoT in 2023 In an era marked by the convergence of technology and industry, the Manufacturing sector stands at the forefront of a transformative wave propelled by the Internet of Things (IoT). Ubiquitous connectivity, data-driven insights, and real-time decision-making have become imperatives for staying competitive in a landscape where efficiency and precision reign supreme. A recent survey commissioned by Ubisense has provided illuminating

A Rapid Increase in IoT Adoption? – Manufacturing & IoT in 2023 Survey2023-10-17T15:17:01+01:00

How to automate human tasks without creating robots

2021-03-02T21:12:59+00:00

As manufacturing facilities re-start around the world, it’s clear several efficient operating practices that are almost universally adopted will be somewhat reversed, certainly in the short-term, possibly longer. Take ‘just-in-time’ or lean manufacturing for example; made famous by Toyota and popular since the 70’s, manufacturers will need to rethink their supply chains to reduce exposure to potentially disruptive events.  As an opinion piece in the FT succinctly put it this weekend; more ‘just-in-case’ than

How to automate human tasks without creating robots2021-03-02T21:12:59+00:00

From zero-code to contact-tracing in under a week

2021-03-02T21:12:17+00:00

Have you ever wondered where all these contact-tracing and social-distancing solutions came from? It’s not like they were developed and ready to roll out – the use of technology to support back-to-work strategies is unprecedented in history. Unprecedented and unpredicted: up until March we’d barely thought about shutting down; up until April we’d never considered what it would mean to open back up, and here we are in May with a veritable smorgasbord of

From zero-code to contact-tracing in under a week2021-03-02T21:12:17+00:00

Don’t Judge a Tracking Technology by its Cover

2021-03-02T21:10:38+00:00

Don’t judge a book by its cover we are told, but I’ll admit that I’ve bought more than one volume based on its cover art. Those books haven’t always provided a life-changing literary experience, but what the heck? It was only a $10 gamble. An investment in location intelligence to underpin a process digitization strategy is somewhat more than a $10 proposition and selecting the right tracking technology deserves more thought than a perusal

Don’t Judge a Tracking Technology by its Cover2021-03-02T21:10:38+00:00
  • It’s about time automotive manufactures replace a 70-year-old technology

It’s about time automotive manufacturers replace a 70-year-old technology

2021-03-02T21:07:22+00:00

The barcode was first imagined in 1948 by Joseph Woodland, inspired by the dots and dashes of Morse code. Woodland was responding to a challenge set by a local retailer in Philadelphia, looking to find ways to speed up the process of checking-out in stores. By the 1960’s, an engineer, David Collins revived this idea and, combined with the availability of lasers, was putting thick and thin striped lines on railway cars so they

It’s about time automotive manufacturers replace a 70-year-old technology2021-03-02T21:07:22+00:00

Gone in 60 seconds – thinking beyond the fixed workstation

2021-03-02T21:06:39+00:00

Ever since Ransom Olds introduced the automotive assembly line in 1901, and Henry Ford the moving conveyor in 1913 we’ve pretty much been building cars the same way: cramming processes into fixed workstations. The fixed workstation is a very simple concept. Step 1: define the takt-time based on planned production volume, typically around 60 seconds for high volume. Step 2: set the line speed and workstation size to create 60s workstations. Step 3: divide

Gone in 60 seconds – thinking beyond the fixed workstation2021-03-02T21:06:39+00:00